Saturday, 19 November 2016

Ten songs ten years

After Sue's post entitled Tracks of my years I decided to post this.

Teen Angel by Mark Dinning 1959
A cheerful little song about a teenage girl killed by a train.


Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini  by Brian Hyland 1960, I was in Margate when this song was popular.

Are you Sure by The Allisons 1961 a Eurovision winner, my first single.

Telstar by the tornados 1962.


Sweets for my Sweet by The Searchers 1963, dancing at the Wimbledon Palais.

Baby I Need Your Loving by The Four Tops 1964 I love Motown.

I got you babe Sonny & Cher 1965, nuff said.

All or Nothing by The Small Faces 1966.

Let the heartbreak begin by Long John Baldry 1967.

Ledgend of Xanadu by Dave Dee Dozy Beaky Mick and Titch 1968 this song probably triggered my love of whips!

Where do you go to my lovely Peter Sarsted 1969 this song needs to be listened to with a glass of merlot.

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

I love everything on your list. I just YouTube'd Are You Sure and could still sing along with every word even though I haven't heard it for years. I Got You Babe was the first record I went in the shop and bought with my own money. Good memories.
Patricia

Attila said...

I was 3 or 4 years old when "Where do you go to my lovely?" came out. My brother asked me, " Where do YOU go to, my lovely, when you're alone in your bed?" I said, "To sleep, of course!" and everyone laughed.

galant said...

Oh, love your choice of songs ... I was mainly a classical fan, always have been, but some pop entered my slipstream ... and I remember Are You Sure by the Allisons, Britain's answer to the Everlys! Loved Don and Phil Everly, but also loved such music as the theme from A Summer Place (to the film) by Percy Faith. Always an Elvis fan, my first single (a 78rpm, too!) was All Shook Up! But adored his film GI Blues and from that Wooden Heart which was also a single's hit (1961). Then the Shadows, never a Cliff fan, with Apache (1961 or thereabouts). But imprinted on my psyche for those years my very favourite, Moon River by Danny Williams. It spoke to me like no other music did in those days. Also, quite unlike anything else, especially in the summer evenings when I returned from my friend's house to my own home, and had to change buses and walk around Torquay harbour, the fairy lights all twinkling, the water inky black and reflecting all the lights, Charles Trenet's La Mer ... I also loved Piaf, music we listened to on an exchange trip to Germany in 1960, and of course, Buddy Holly's Heartbeat and Everyday. I Got You Babe was when I was a young married, but there was also a song by Esther and Abi OFarim, Cinderella Rockefella, which was a catchy little number. Then along came Abba, oh, wonderful Abba, so much more musical in their arrangements than the Beatles - Fernando, Dancing Queen ... now I don't like any pop, it all sounds much the same, mainly screeching females with voices like a cat has been trodden on. Love the Peter Sarstedt, great lyrics, better than the music.
Margaret P

galant said...

PS Forgot to mention the late, great Roy Orbison. All the singers of 'my' generation had very distinctive voices. And Neil Diamond, too. I love his song, America from The Jazz Singer.
Margaret P

Joy said...

Can't possibly remember the exact years of songs but o remember those I loved and had some connection to what I was going through at the time.
1950s (I'll skip over the 40s and 'How much is that doggie in the window?' I was too young to know better.)

'Singing the blues' Guy Mitchell
'Blue suede shoes' the incomparable Elvis
'Rock around the clock.' Bill Haley. I skipped a 6th form conference to see him arrive at Southampton docks.
'Smoke gets in your eyes.' The Platters. Think this was a revival. I was at College and unfortunately the lovely flame never got close to starting never mind dying.Very much unrequited love.

The 60s and after.

Moon River. I watched Breakfast at Tiffanys in Harlech on a miserable afternoon. The cinema was a tin hut, we sat on an assortment of diningroom/kitchen chairs and at halftime the usherette brought icecreams round on a tea trolley. The rain hitting the tin roof all but drowned the sound but I heard enough of Moon River to fall in love with it.
'These boots were made for walking.' Nancy Sinatra no explanation necessary.
'Nightingale.' The Beatles. Much under played but one of the best.
'Dream a little dream.' Beautiful South.

I listen to the occsional pop song now and think, "I wonder who will be whistling that tomorrow?" It's just a shouty noise isn't it?

Anonymous said...

I left a comment on Sue's blog, but only mentioned Elvis and Brenda Lee. I remember The Allisons and there was also The Brook Brothers with 'Warpaint'. I think that was their only song. I liked Long John Baldry with his deep voice (I have a thing for deep voices). Eden Kane 'Well, I Ask Ya', Helen Shapiro 'Don't Treat Me Like A Child', Smokey Robinson 'Tears Of A Clown', The Hollies 'He's My Brother'. Like Joy, Guy Mitchell and 'Singing The Blues', The Four Tops 'Reach Out For Me'. There are lots of others, but are escaping my memory for now.

I am told I live in the past because I much prefer the music from then than the present day stuff, in fact I don't know any of the current 'stars' and think like Joy that it is a just loud noise.

Joan (Wales)

Hard up Hester said...

Did you know that Eden Kane and Peter Sarsted were brothers

Anonymous said...

I had forgotten that, but now you mention it yes I did know at the time.

Joan (Wales)

galant said...

Wow, I had no idea that Eden Kane (Well, I Ask You!) and Peter Sarstedt were brothers! You learn something everyday, don't ya! But, Joan, the present day stuff doesn't hold a candle to the pop of the 1950s/1960s when singers had distinctive voices - I mean, you couldn't mistake Elvis for Roy Orbison, could you?
I have loved this post, Hester, it has brought back such happy memories of those days more than 50 years ago!
Margaret P